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Driving Medtech - Ireland's Story

 

medtech

Written by Duncan Gruselle, Executive Search Specialist

InterSearch Ireland 

Ireland - Driving Medtech 

Ireland is a globally recognised centre of excellence for Medical Technology, home to over 300 MedTech companies. 13 of the world's top 15 MedTech companies have operations in Ireland, with a total of 25,000 people employed in the sector. Ireland is now the 2nd largest exporter of MedTech products in Europe. Medical device and diagnostic products currently make up 8% of Ireland's total merchandise exports.

The 300+ MedTech companies are supported by an integrated network of co-operating industry, academic, clinical and government agencies. With the highest number of personnel per capita employed in MedTech in Europe, Ireland has a deep pool of experienced and highly trained technical and managerial talent. Key areas of specific excellence include mechanical, electronic, materials engineering and science specialists.

Industry and Academia co-operationmedtech rising

The MedTech sector also benefits from Ireland’s high ranking globally in termsof the employability of university graduates.  The flow of skilled graduates is delivered through Ireland’s seven universities and 13 Institutes of Technology, but it is the close cooperation between industry and academic institutions that ensures the evolving skill needs of sector are constantly met. This close working between MedTech, Education and Research sectors reinforces the importance of exchanging of technology and ideas, which in turn helps drive growth in research and development.

An impressive 60% of MedTech companies in Ireland engage in research and development, supported by Ireland’s network of clinical research facilities.

InterSearch Ireland - Sourcing Talent

By combining InterSearch Ireland’s expertise across both the private and public sector, we deliver talent acquisition services to a variety of clients across the commercial MedTech sector as well as universities and academic research centres with a focus on MedTech.

 

Why Leaders Must Inspire Learning

 

 Written by Clementina Mustapha

Executive Search Researcher

InterSearch Ireland 

 

Why Leaders Must Inspire Learning 

“When the effective leader is finished with his work, the people say it happened naturally.”- Lao Tzu

photo 1504257365157 1496a50d48f2Leaders want their teams to not only learn about the resources available to them, (technology, human capital – connections and networks, legislations, internal and external policies) but significantly, how to harness and use resources around them for the advancement and achievement of organisational goals. The ability to inspire teams should be one that comes naturally to a leader and if not, must be learned. Leadership must be inspirational, provoking learning because not only does the team learn, but the organisation progresses in ways that puts it a step ahead of the competition.

It is well to foster a knowledge based organisation, however, in a constantly changing environment, leaders must ensure that learning is targeted and relevant to stated objectives and helps the organisation along in its developmental or growth phases. It is important to note that an organisation’s future success depends on identifying and developing the next generation of its leaders. Managers are not only leading their units and departments, but are also nurturing the future leadership of the organisation.

 

Stages of Organisational Development and Control System

Considering the organisational growth above, it is important for organisations to target individuals for leadership positions who are not only academically qualified, but have proven track record of leadership in the current and developmental projections of the organisation.

Is a delegator most relevant at the initial phase? This for most start-ups is one of experiments, trials, iterations and creativity. A hands-on approach is vital in this phase, not only because of the need for the business idea and project to take root, but the need to safeguard initial investments is crucial at this stage. This is the phase that requires a nurturing of the business idea by the creator. Delegation may not be the core need of leadership at this phase.

As the organisation develops, number of employees grows, markets and customer base expand, the leadership needs change and it is the responsibility of management to ensure that line managers, middle management and executives are able to lead and steer the organisation in tandem with its phase and prevailing external socio-economic circumstances as well as internal organisational culture. 

Leadership

Ideas and propositions are not only products in today’s economy, but they are the bedrock upon which goods and services are created, leaders are not just saddled with the ultimate goal of testing and learning about them, they have the vital responsibility of deciding how the organisation is going to make progress in terms of creating a value proposition and business model that works and is geared toward achieving set goals.

Management must determine the specific leadership skills and behaviours needed to effectively implement and achieve the company’s strategy. Be it in the planning and execution of a merger, penetrating new global markets, increasing sales operations, introducing and implementing the use of technology in public services or delayering the corporate structure, the importance of time spent thinking through skills requirements to successfully execute identified initiative cannot be overemphasised.

The growing role of technologies such as the Internet of Things, blockchain, artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms are bringing decision-makers to cross-roads.  This is true for both private and public sectors. To effectively respond to the demands of the 21st century, leaders in governments especially need to be agile and adaptable to seize the opportunities provided by digital transformation. They have to possess the ability to quickly choose between the different alternatives available, most times with inadequate information and high degrees of uncertainty, combined with public structures that are often bureaucratic, risk-adverse and hierarchical.

Identifying and employing top executives and leaders who recognise the significant and often dynamic role of technology and globalisation in today’s socio-economic environment is key to achieving organisational goals. A major requirement for the success of implementing any strategic objective in all sectors is the ability of leaders to inspire and encourage learning.

Responding to questions on leadership and how we target potential candidates for top management positions both in the public and private sectors, Duncan Gruselle who leads the Health Care and Public-Sector practice group at InterSearch Ireland responded that:

“targeting a global talent pool of relevant candidates is a scratch at the surface of identifying what clients need in their leaders. The ability to filter and target individuals who fit the organisational ambitions of our clients and who through their track records have shown that they can move the organisation along in its strategic journey is key to identifying desirable leadership for our clients. Determining best fit requires much more than having the qualifications, but showing an ability to align oneself with what the client organisation represents”.

Learning is key to knowledge and knowledge in this instance provides future leaders the opportunity to identify organisations and cultures that they aim to lead. Aspiring to lead must not be considered in isolation- identifying who (team/organisation), where(time/sector/location), what(objectives/goals) and how(style/culture) must form the basis upon which leadership aspirations is planned.

“A leader’s role is to raise people’s aspirations for what they can become and to release their energies so they will try to get there.”— David R. Gergen

Edwards Lifesciences to create 600 jobs

 

Edwards Lifesciences to create 600 mid-west jobs in €80m investment

 

Heart LifesciencesWritten by John Kennedy, Silicon Republic

Reposted by InterSearch Ireland 

Edwards Lifesciences is currently looking at three sites in Limerick and Shannon to locate new operation.

 

The global leader for structural heart disease monitoring Edwards Lifesciences is to create 600 new jobs in Ireland’s mid-west as part of a major €80m investment.

The company will establish a new plant to manufacture delivery components for its transcatheter heart valve therapies.

‘The addition of a manufacturing location in Ireland is an element of Edwards’ global supply strategy to support future growth’
– JOE NUZZOLESE

Edwards Lifesciences is a California-headquartered leader in patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease and critical care monitoring

The addition of the Irish plant to Edwards’ global supply network, which includes a similar existing facility in the US, will initially be configured to support the manufacturing of therapies that enable minimally invasive procedures on patients’ aortic, mitral and tricuspid valves, where open heart surgery would previously have been the norm.

Hiring begins

Edwards is planning to hire approximately 60 people this year in various functions, such as production staff, engineering and professional management, to work at its initial site located in the Shannon Free Zone.

The company plans to complete a new, purpose-built manufacturing facility in the Mid-West of Ireland in 2020.  Once the facility is fully operational, the company expects it will employ approximately 600 people.

According to reports, the company is evaluating at least three sites in both Limerick and Shannon.

Edwards’ investment in the project is expected to amount to approximately €80m.

“The addition of a manufacturing location in Ireland is an element of Edwards’ global supply strategy to support future growth and reliability of supply, and continues the growth in employment Edwards has experienced both in the United States and around the world,” said Joe Nuzzolese, Edwards’ corporate vice president, global supply chain.

“Choosing this location included many considerations, but an important one is a talented workforce with experience in medical technology.  We look forward to becoming an integral part of the local community through engagement and philanthropic support, and providing educational and professional opportunities for our employees.

“We are excited to welcome these new associates into Edwards, with the shared goal of serving more patients around the world by delivering high quality life-saving technologies.”

The arrival of Edwards Lifesciences is good news for the mid-west region and for Ireland, said Martin Shanahan, CEO of IDA Ireland.

“The company’s arrival further enhances Ireland’s reputation as a preferred location for leading companies in the life-sciences sector.

“Winning investment for regional locations is a key focus for IDA Ireland and this project is an excellent one to secure for this region.”

Takeda to create up to 70 new jobs in Dublin

Takeda to create up to 70 new jobs in Dublin 

 

takedaWritten by Robert McHugh

Reposted by InterSearch Ireland 

1/3/18

 It was announced yesterday that Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited is to create up to 70 new jobs and invest €25m in the construction of a new regenerative medicine facility at its site in Grange Castle.

The largest pharmaceutical company in Japan, Takeda first set up operations in Ireland in 1997 manufacturing products for global markets. In 2002 Takeda chose Dublin as the location for its first active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) facility outside of Japan.

In 2017, Takeda also announced a €40m investment in the construction of a stand-alone production facility for the manufacture of part of their Oncology portfolio at Grange Castle.
  
The investment by Takeda will expand their Grange Castle site’s existing footprint, with the construction of a new standalone modular cell therapy facility dedicated to manufacturing a novel stem cell therapy. The investment will also create 70 temporary construction jobs. The facility will be in commercial operation by 2021.  
  
Welcoming the announcement yesterday, Minister of State, Pat Breen said, "The pharma industry makes a huge contribution to the Irish economy in terms of jobs and exports, and is one of the fastest growing sectors. Takeda's decision to invest in Ireland is a great win and vote of confidence in Ireland and it builds on our ongoing expansion of the sector here. I'm delighted that this investment will bring a further 70 jobs to the company's existing Clondalkin facility."

Source: www.businessworld.ie

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